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"Sumer is icumen in" not

Written some time in the 13th century, not known who by. One suggestion has been a monk at Reading Abbey, John of Fornsete (from Norfolk). Another is W of Wycombe. He was at the priory in Leominster in Herefordshire.

It was written in the Wessex dialect of Middle English. suggesting that the writer would have come from an area from Cornwall to Gloucestershire.

That would seem to rule out John of Fornsete. Part of his work included the collection of manuscript. Although the only copy existing of the song was found at Reading, chances are that he collected it rather than wrote it.

W of Wycombe is more of a possibility. Although Wycombe as in High Wycombe is nowhere near the West Country, he has also been called William of Winchcombe. That;s to the north of Cheltenham There was a Benedictine abbey there at the time.

Reading Abbey arranged for the building of the Benedictine priory at Leominster. W of Wycombe/William of Winchcombe would have been sent to Leominster to be the precentor at the abbey (the person responsible to the arrangement of services and music for those). So he might have come originally from the abbey at Winchcombe, would have a Wessex dialect, and, as precentor, would know that John of Fornsete collected manuscripts.

Not possible to prove the above but is plausible.

El Loro
@slimfern posted:




The billy-goat farting, (or "The stag cavorting") ... slight difference between those two translations..


It is quite possible that both are correct, a play on words, deliberately capable of a polite meaning and not so polite.

There are examples of that in Shakespeare's plays. A good example is in Hamlet where he tells Ophelia "Get thee to a nunnery". There's the obvious polite meaning and the less obvious vicious impolite meaning. At the time a nunnery was also a slang word for a brothel

El Loro
@El Loro posted:


It is quite possible that both are correct, a play on words, deliberately capable of a polite meaning and not so polite.

There are examples of that in Shakespeare's plays. A good example is in Hamlet where he tells Ophelia "Get thee to a nunnery". There's the obvious polite meaning and the less obvious vicious impolite meaning. At the time a nunnery was also a slang word for a brothel

A sign of a time when ladies were 'delicate'

Did not know that about the word Nunnery...

slimfern

Slim, very little new of interest on the Talking Pictures tv channel during the coming week other than a 1950 film on Thursday at 9 am. There are two versions of this film. The original black and white film is called "The Great Rupert". It was later colourised and that version is called "A Christmas Wish", I don't know which version is being shown as the Talking Pictures has it as TGR but the Radio Times and my television EPG has it as ACW.

It's  a mild family comedy about two families overcoming obstacles. Stars Jimmy Durante, Terry Moore and Tom Drake.
Also stars Rupert, who was created and animated by George Pal.

Rupert is a squirrel so the film might amuse others here

Film does have some smoking in it, including apparently Rupert. Although there were some concerns about the dangers of smoking, it wasn't until some years later in 1957 in the UK and then in 1964 the USA that major reports into the danger were published.

El Loro

Incidentally, Terry Young's previous film was the original version of "Mighty Joes Young" (1948), made by the people who did the original "King Kong" film. "Might Joes Young" was an animated giant gorilla but the film isn't a remake of "King Kong" and was less violent.
So she went from an animated giant gorilla in one film to an animated squirrel in her next

El Loro
@El Loro posted:

Incidentally, Terry Young's previous film was the original version of "Mighty Joes Young" (1948), made by the people who did the original "King Kong" film. "Might Joes Young" was an animated giant gorilla but the film isn't a remake of "King Kong" and was less violent.
So she went from an animated giant gorilla in one film to an animated squirrel in her next

Oh a Cyril the squirrel

Moonie
@El Loro posted:

Slim, very little new of interest on the Talking Pictures tv channel during the coming week other than a 1950 film on Thursday at 9 am. There are two versions of this film. The original black and white film is called "The Great Rupert". It was later colourised and that version is called "A Christmas Wish", I don't know which version is being shown as the Talking Pictures has it as TGR but the Radio Times and my television EPG has it as ACW.

It's  a mild family comedy about two families overcoming obstacles. Stars Jimmy Durante, Terry Moore and Tom Drake.
Also stars Rupert, who was created and animated by George Pal.

Rupert is a squirrel so the film might amuse others here

Film does have some smoking in it, including apparently Rupert. Although there were some concerns about the dangers of smoking, it wasn't until some years later in 1957 in the UK and then in 1964 the USA that major reports into the danger were published.

Thank you El

slimfern