Skip to main content

@El Loro posted:

I think she did, Slim

Here's a recent BBC news article about a case the barrister Lois Lane was handling, representing the campaign group bringing the action against the oil drilling company:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/c066z7x20xdo
I don't know if the judges have made a judgment yet, could take some time.

Are the villagers really worried about the impact on the local environment or are they (understandably) fearing that if oil is found that an oil field/plant would affect their house prices?
I suppose the lesser impact of the two evils has to be the way to go forward...
An already existing Massive Carbon Footprint or a possible contamination and eyesore

slimfern
@slimfern posted:

Are the villagers really worried about the impact on the local environment or are they (understandably) fearing that if oil is found that an oil field/plant would affect their house prices?
I suppose the lesser impact of the two evils has to be the way to go forward...
An already existing Massive Carbon Footprint or a possible contamination and eyesore

What may have an impact on the judges' decision could be this decision by the Supreme Court yesterday:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cxwwzmn12g9o

El Loro
@El Loro posted:

What may have an impact on the judges' decision could be this decision by the Supreme Court yesterday:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cxwwzmn12g9o

Okay...but surely the 'downstream emissions' will happen anyways whether it be from a new oil site or an older one?

Plus if you take into consideration that Globally, emissions from oil tankers are estimated to have totaled 210 million metric tons of COβ‚‚ in 2020.
Wouldn't 'keeping it local' be beneficial in the long run

slimfern
Last edited by slimfern
@slimfern posted:

Okay...but surely the 'downstream emissions' will happen anyways whether it be from a new oil site or an older one?

Plus if you take into consideration that Globally, emissions from oil tankers are estimated to have totaled 210 million metric tons of COβ‚‚ in 2020.
Wouldn't 'keeping it local' be beneficial in the long run

On a slightly different aspect, there's some statistics by country of COβ‚‚ emissions in 2022 on this link:
https://worldpopulationreview....emissions-by-country

There's a list of the 10 countries with the highest rates.
Top is China but that has the highest population. But per capita China has 8.85, the USA 14.44, India 1.91, Russia 13.31, and Japan 8.61.
The UK has 5.

El Loro

Good morning everyone

A rather cloudy day here, with a forecast high of 23Β°
Monday to Thursday forecast to be warmer with highs of 25-27Β°. There's a yellow health alert for that as being close to the heatwave threshold, the south east the hottest area. Temperature forecast to go back down from Friday,

I hope everyone has a good day

El Loro

Slim, I haven't seen anything new of note on the Talking Pictures tv channel during the coming week.

Not a recommendation as such but "Treasure Island" (1972) is on Wednesday at 13.10. It's a low budget British/Italian film mainly shot in Spain. Of note is that Orson Welles played Long John Silver. It was a project that Orson Welles had attempted to start back in the 1960s, he wrote a script, but his project didn't go ahead due to carious problems including his health..Eventually this film went ahead with Welles's script being rewritten. He didn't approve of the changes and so requested that in the film credit for the script he was called O W Jeeves
Welles voiced over his part after the film was shot. Apparently that was done one night in Paris, possibly with white wine. The result is that his voice is rather mumbling in the film. I think the broadcast will have the subtitles option and that may be needed to understand what he's saying, There is a version of the film for American tv where his voice is redubbed by another actor.

El Loro
@El Loro posted:

Slim, I haven't seen anything new of note on the Talking Pictures tv channel during the coming week.

Not a recommendation as such but "Treasure Island" (1972) is on Wednesday at 13.10. It's a low budget British/Italian film mainly shot in Spain. Of note is that Orson Welles played Long John Silver. It was a project that Orson Welles had attempted to start back in the 1960s, he wrote a script, but his project didn't go ahead due to carious problems including his health..Eventually this film went ahead with Welles's script being rewritten. He didn't approve of the changes and so requested that in the film credit for the script he was called O W Jeeves
Welles voiced over his part after the film was shot. Apparently that was done one night in Paris, possibly with white wine. The result is that his voice is rather mumbling in the film. I think the broadcast will have the subtitles option and that may be needed to understand what he's saying, There is a version of the film for American tv where his voice is redubbed by another actor.

Thanks El

Think I'll give this one a miss....especially as even Mr Welles was not keen to put his name to it

slimfern
@slimfern posted:

Thanks El

Think I'll give this one a miss....especially as even Mr Welles was not keen to put his name to it

I saw a little clip from "Treasure Island" and I agree with you about giving it a miss

Back in 1938 so before "Citizen Kane", Orson Welles had his Mercury Theatre. Some of that work was made for radio, the most famous being his version of "The War of the Worlds" which caused a certain amount of panic amongst listeners thinking that the Martians had really landed.

Another adaptation was "Treasure Island". If you are interested that's on Youtube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLXpdv0eI78
In that Welles played both the adult Jim Hawkins (I assume as a narrator) and as Long John Silver. Also features some of the actors who went on to be in "Citizen Kane" - Agnes Moorehead as Mrs Hawkins (Mary Kane), George Coulouris as Captain Smollett (Walter Parks Thatcher), and Ray Collins as Ben Gunn (James W Gettys), The names in brackets being their roles in Citizen Kane. Although Joseph Cotten was in a few of those radio adaptions he wasn't on this one.

El Loro

Back in November I mentioned a film "Sudden Fear" (1952), a film noir starring Joan Crawford, Jack Palance and Gloria Grahame. I got around to watching it yesterday evening,

A good film noir. Crawford relatively likeable for a Crawford film as a wealthy playwright is involved in casting of her new play, Palance does an audition, though Crawford declines to accept him for the role so he leaves the theatre. Later she goes on a train journey and Palance just happens to get on the train and joins her, A rapid romance and they marry. Anyone with a knowledge of 1950s films will know that Palance played baddies at that time and so would know that the Palance character had ulterior motives, And so he did,
The last part of the film is the strongest part and is very stylish, with the cinematography being a bit reminiscent of silent German expressionist films in the use of camera angles, and shadows. Film was in black and white, colour would not have the same effect. The cinematographer was Charles Lang, one of the best, and made many classics (including "The Ghost and Mrs Muir") Lang excelled in the use of chiaroscuro, light and shade.

On a trivia point was one the scriptwriters was was Lenore Coffee and the film was adapted from a story by Edna Sherry

Crawford, Palance and Lang were nominated for Oscars but didn't win.

El Loro
@El Loro posted:

Back in November I mentioned a film "Sudden Fear" (1952), a film noir starring Joan Crawford, Jack Palance and Gloria Grahame. I got around to watching it yesterday evening,

A good film noir. Crawford relatively likeable for a Crawford film as a wealthy playwright is involved in casting of her new play, Palance does an audition, though Crawford declines to accept him for the role so he leaves the theatre. Later she goes on a train journey and Palance just happens to get on the train and joins her, A rapid romance and they marry. Anyone with a knowledge of 1950s films will know that Palance played baddies at that time and so would know that the Palance character had ulterior motives, And so he did,
The last part of the film is the strongest part and is very stylish, with the cinematography being a bit reminiscent of silent German expressionist films in the use of camera angles, and shadows. Film was in black and white, colour would not have the same effect. The cinematographer was Charles Lang, one of the best, and made many classics (including "The Ghost and Mrs Muir") Lang excelled in the use of chiaroscuro, light and shade.

On a trivia point was one the scriptwriters was was Lenore Coffee and the film was adapted from a story by Edna Sherry

Crawford, Palance and Lang were nominated for Oscars but didn't win.

It's on you tube El...do you recommend it?

slimfern
@slimfern posted:

It's on you tube El...do you recommend it?

I'd recommend it, Slim,
The film noir genre has its roots in silent German expressionist films. The likes of Fritz Lang and Billy Wilder came from Germany and were influential on film noir. (Fritz Lang and Charles Lang were not related). The film is a good example of the genre. The end section is an interesting use of sound as well to create tension.
Incidentally, in 1924 Alfred Hitchcock was sent by Gainsborough Pictures to studios near Berlin to work as assistant director and art director on a silent British/German film called "The Blackguard" and that experience was influential on his subsequent career. I don't think that's on Youtube though there are little extracts from it.

El Loro
@El Loro posted:

I'd recommend it, Slim,
The film noir genre has its roots in silent German expressionist films. The likes of Fritz Lang and Billy Wilder came from Germany and were influential on film noir. (Fritz Lang and Charles Lang were not related). The film is a good example of the genre. The end section is an interesting use of sound as well to create tension.
Incidentally, in 1924 Alfred Hitchcock was sent by Gainsborough Pictures to studios near Berlin to work as assistant director and art director on a silent British/German film called "The Blackguard" and that experience was influential on his subsequent career. I don't think that's on Youtube though there are little extracts from it.

Okay, thanks El

slimfern