NHS in England is under cyber attack

I was enjoying a nice day out on Saturday, so I'm still catching up with the fallout from this (and no doubt that will continue when I return to work tomorrow...   ).

 

Official advice from Microsoft (includes links to security updates for old systems):

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

 

Blog by MalwareTech, the guy who inadvertently activated the malware's "kill switch":

How to Accidentally Stop a Global Cyber Attacks

 

It's (unsurprisingly) rather technical, but readable and interesting nonetheless. It also helps correct some of the media misreporting during all the panic and confusion. MalwareTech is not an amateur, but an information security professional: his job is to track and stop malware,  thus assisting victims and law enforcement. He just happened to be on holiday at the time (his boss has given him another week off to make up for the lost break!).

 

Also, it looks like the "kill switch" wasn't actually an intentional "kill switch" (self-destruct mechanism) after all: current thinking is that it was a badly-engineered attempt by the bad guys to try to prevent the good guys analysing the malware. In theory, the bad guys' thinking was valid (and has been done before), but in practise its poor implementation  provided the good guys with a simple way of stopping it altogether (even if they didn't initially realise it).

Eugene's Lair posted:

I was enjoying a nice day out on Saturday, so I'm still catching up with the fallout from this (and no doubt that will continue when I return to work tomorrow...   ).

 

Official advice from Microsoft (includes links to security updates for old systems):

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

As EL's post says the above link includes links to patches for older versions of Windows including Windows XP. Microsoft have taken this rare step due to the widespread problems. Micosoft also says that Windows 10 users were not targeted in Friday's attack.

El Loro posted:
Eugene's Lair posted:

I was enjoying a nice day out on Saturday, so I'm still catching up with the fallout from this (and no doubt that will continue when I return to work tomorrow...   ).

 

Official advice from Microsoft (includes links to security updates for old systems):

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

As EL's post says the above link includes links to patches for older versions of Windows including Windows XP. Microsoft have taken this rare step due to the widespread problems. Micosoft also says that Windows 10 users were not targeted in Friday's attack.

I'm on 8.1 but I keep it updated as soon as they come out    Usually every second Wednesday in the month unless it's something that is urgent 

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:

2 more have appeared!

Make sure you reboot your machine to fully complete any updates, and then check that there aren't any other updates pending.

I find it a good idea to do the same thing when manually updating my anti-virus software: do an update, then keep attempting to update again until it comes back with a "not required" message (or equivalent).

 

(As an illustration: I've just gone and attempted a manual update to my anti-virus software, and although it last did an automatic update only 4 hours ago, there were 4 updates waiting!  I think we can presume that the anti-virus guys are being kept very busy at the moment...   )

Not too surprisingly when we got into work this morning there were notices on all the computers saying "DO NOT SWITCH ON!"

 

Some folk got their computers back mid-m0rning, but I didn't get mine back until mid-day and even then it was a bit unstable and all its functions weren't readily available. There were workarounds to access some apparently 'missing' stuff, but it was a real pain!

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:

Not too surprisingly when we got into work this morning there were notices on all the computers saying "DO NOT SWITCH ON!"

 

Some folk got their computers back mid-m0rning, but I didn't get mine back until mid-day and even then it was a bit unstable and all its functions weren't readily available. There were workarounds to access some apparently 'missing' stuff, but it was a real pain!

Eugene's Lair posted:

Interesting comparison...

Sophos are a major software security company, who have the NHS amongst their clients. Here are screen shots of how Sophos publicly portrayed their relationship with the NHS before (top) and after (bottom) the WannaCrypt attack:

That's a bit worrying - our company (some months ago) asked if we'd mind installing Sophos on our home computers to maintain security of the company system (we'll often log in from home)   I've been relying on that as an a/v - maybe i should get something else?

Kaffs posted:
Eugene's Lair posted:

Interesting comparison...

Sophos are a major software security company, who have the NHS amongst their clients. Here are screen shots of how Sophos publicly portrayed their relationship with the NHS before (top) and after (bottom) the WannaCrypt attack:

That's a bit worrying - our company (some months ago) asked if we'd mind installing Sophos on our home computers to maintain security of the company system (we'll often log in from home)   I've been relying on that as an a/v - maybe i should get something else?

I've not used Sophos products before, but they're supposed to have a good reputation, and I've used their guides in the past for Facebook settings, etc.

 

The main point about these "before and after" shots is that they were essentially making claims of 100% security, which simply isn't realistic and may well have led to complacency. General feeling seems to be that in this case, they've over-sold their product and underestimated the problem.

 

The full Register article I got this from can be found here.

A hacking group closely tied to North Korea was behind the massive WannaCry attack earlier this month, security company Symantec says.

 

The way the attack was set up made it "highly likely" that the Lazarus group was responsible, it said.

 

Lazarus has been blamed for a 2014 attack on Sony and the theft of $81m (£62m) from Bangladesh's central bank.

 

In those attacks, the group is believed to have worked on behalf of North Korea's government.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-40010996

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