The Winner Takes It All - New and expanded name of the game!

Baz posted:
Roxan posted:
Baz posted:
Roxan posted:

🎼 If you've got the blues, then I've got some news...

Join in the fun in your blue suede shoes... 🎹

Clue please  ?

80's retrospective British sitcom! 

Ok...I’ll work on it 

Got it .... Ho Di ho Di ho 

Baz posted:
Baz posted:
Roxan posted:
Baz posted:
Roxan posted:

🎼 If you've got the blues, then I've got some news...

Join in the fun in your blue suede shoes... 🎹

Clue please  ?

80's retrospective British sitcom! 

Ok...I’ll work on it 

Got it .... Ho Di ho Di ho 

Yes!

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Roxan posted:

Spoken:

"... A shadowy flight into the dangerous world of a man who does not exist..."

There's something vaguely familiar about that, but I can't place it for now!

Clue... The main "sidekick" is not human, not animal...

Roxan posted:
Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Roxan posted:

Spoken:

"... A shadowy flight into the dangerous world of a man who does not exist..."

There's something vaguely familiar about that, but I can't place it for now!

Clue... The main "sidekick" is not human, not animal...

So a machine then ?

Baz posted:
Roxan posted:
Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Roxan posted:

Spoken:

"... A shadowy flight into the dangerous world of a man who does not exist..."

There's something vaguely familiar about that, but I can't place it for now!

Clue... The main "sidekick" is not human, not animal...

So a machine then ?

Yes.  US show.

This is  a multipart poser.

Person A wrote and played the instrument for a piece of music originally named after his daughter.
Shortly afterwards that piece of music was used as the theme for a television series which I'll call B. Although that series is long forgotten, the piece of music whcih was renamed as B became much better known.

 

The piece of music had no lyrics but later on person C wrote some lyrics and that version was also successful.

 

A few years later person C wrote or co-wrote the theme music for a television series which I'll call D. That theme music (there are no lyrics) many years later will be remembered by anyone who watched D.

 

So who is A, what is B, who is C (not well known) and what is D?

El Loro posted:

This is  a multipart poser.

Person A wrote and played the instrument for a piece of music originally named after his daughter.
Shortly afterwards that piece of music was used as the theme for a television series which I'll call B. Although that series is long forgotten, the piece of music whcih was renamed as B became much better known.

 

The piece of music had no lyrics but later on person C wrote some lyrics and that version was also successful.

 

A few years later person C wrote or co-wrote the theme music for a television series which I'll call D. That theme music (there are no lyrics) many years later will be remembered by anyone who watched D.

 

So who is A, what is B, who is C (not well known) and what is D?

Good grief El .....not a hope 

To help a bit with my poser. B series was shown on the BBC in 1961. D series was also on the BBC in the latter part of 1964 to the beginning of 1965.

Although B series is probably long lost, D series is still available on DVD as, of its genre, one of the most loved series ever. Anybody who watched the series back in 1964 will still be able to hum the theme music immediately after all these years.

El Loro posted:

To help a bit with my poser. B series was shown on the BBC in 1961. D series was also on the BBC in the latter part of 1964 to the beginning of 1965.

Although B series is probably long lost, D series is still available on DVD as, of its genre, one of the most loved series ever. Anybody who watched the series back in 1964 will still be able to hum the theme music immediately after all these years.

Is D magic roundabout ?

Roxan posted:
El Loro posted:

No, not Z cars.

 

For A I deliberately didn't mention which instument he played as he was one of the most famous Brit for that.

Am I on the right track with "Jenny"?

Yes, so you will probably be correct with what you think A and B are. You may need to do a bit of research to then find who C is and once you do D will follow.

 

Although series B and D are from very different genres, you will see some similarity

El Loro posted:

This is  a multipart poser.

Person A wrote and played the instrument for a piece of music originally named after his daughter.
Shortly afterwards that piece of music was used as the theme for a television series which I'll call B. Although that series is long forgotten, the piece of music whcih was renamed as B became much better known.

 

The piece of music had no lyrics but later on person C wrote some lyrics and that version was also successful.

 

A few years later person C wrote or co-wrote the theme music for a television series which I'll call D. That theme music (there are no lyrics) many years later will be remembered by anyone who watched D.

 

So who is A, what is B, who is C (not well known) and what is D?

I've now read Roxan's last post, and - with her permission - I'm going to take this. However my immediate reaction on seeing this post from El Loro was: "Isn't life weird at times?".

 

The fact is that although I didn't see this post until I got home this evening, I've been humming this tune all day. I've even been making a few half-hearted attempts at the lyrics. I suspect it's down to my previous comments about "White Horses" being the "loveliest theme song ever" - this tune is probably the only real competition.

 

So: A = Acker Bilk (the tune was originally called "Jenny");

B= "Stranger on the Shore";

C = Robert Mellin (Yeah: I had to look it up, although I already knew there were lyrics), which means;

D = "The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe".

 

Aside #1: The brother of a family friend was in Acker Bilk's original band.

Aside #2: I once saw Acker perform in concert with Humphrey Lyttelton - an extraordinary combination.

Eugene's Lair posted:
El Loro posted:

This is  a multipart poser.

Person A wrote and played the instrument for a piece of music originally named after his daughter.
Shortly afterwards that piece of music was used as the theme for a television series which I'll call B. Although that series is long forgotten, the piece of music whcih was renamed as B became much better known.

 

The piece of music had no lyrics but later on person C wrote some lyrics and that version was also successful.

 

A few years later person C wrote or co-wrote the theme music for a television series which I'll call D. That theme music (there are no lyrics) many years later will be remembered by anyone who watched D.

 

So who is A, what is B, who is C (not well known) and what is D?

I've now read Roxan's last post, and - with her permission - I'm going to take this. However my immediate reaction on seeing this post from El Loro was: "Isn't life weird at times?".

 

The fact is that although I didn't see this post until I got home this evening, I've been humming this tune all day. I've even been making a few half-hearted attempts at the lyrics. I suspect it's down to my previous comments about "White Horses" being the "loveliest theme song ever" - this tune is probably the only real competition.

 

So: A = Acker Bilk (the tune was originally called "Jenny");

B= "Stranger on the Shore";

C = Robert Mellin (Yeah: I had to look it up, although I already knew there were lyrics), which means;

D = "The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe".

 

Aside #1: The brother of a family friend was in Acker Bilk's original band.

Aside #2: I once saw Acker perform in concert with Humphrey Lyttelton - an extraordinary combination.

Hey Eugene, fine with me! The "Post on Friday" comment was a reference to D! 

Absolutely loved Acker Bilk, a gift from my father who was a huge jazz fan.

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Former MemberMoonieEl Loro
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