Baz posted:

I enjoyed that series ....roll on Spring 

Yes, it's always interesting. Have caught up with Thursday and Friday.

 

Have been trying to figure out the difference between ch = ck sound and ch = Scottish ch sound. It's very subtle.

CK is produced when the tongue is pressed firmly against the back teeth and the tip is sort of dropped down from the roof of the mouth without actually having been touching it.

The Scottish ch has the tongue in a similar position but not as tightly against the teeth and the tongue is kept still and straight with the breath sort of forced over the tongue.

 

Don't know if that'll help any 'non-Scot' suddenly be able to produce our .ch. sound, but it is the best description I could come-up with.

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Baz posted:

I enjoyed that series ....roll on Spring 

Yes, it's always interesting. Have caught up with Thursday and Friday.

 

Have been trying to figure out the difference between ch = ck sound and ch = Scottish ch sound. It's very subtle.

CK is produced when the tongue is pressed firmly against the back teeth and the tip is sort of dropped down from the roof of the mouth without actually having been touching it.

The Scottish ch has the tongue in a similar position but not as tightly against the teeth and the tongue is kept still and straight with the breath sort of forced over the tongue.

 

Don't know if that'll help any 'non-Scot' suddenly be able to produce our .ch. sound, but it is the best description I could come-up with.

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Baz posted:

I enjoyed that series ....roll on Spring 

Can you contain yourself for 4 months? It's usually the end of May.

Thanks EFFT 

Extremely Fluffy Fluffy Thing posted:
Baz posted:

I enjoyed that series ....roll on Spring 

Yes, it's always interesting. Have caught up with Thursday and Friday.

 

Have been trying to figure out the difference between ch = ck sound and ch = Scottish ch sound. It's very subtle.

CK is produced when the tongue is pressed firmly against the back teeth and the tip is sort of dropped down from the roof of the mouth without actually having been touching it.

The Scottish ch has the tongue in a similar position but not as tightly against the teeth and the tongue is kept still and straight with the breath sort of forced over the tongue.

 

Don't know if that'll help any 'non-Scot' suddenly be able to produce our .ch. sound, but it is the best description I could come-up with.

Mr Y describes our ch sound as “clearing your throat”

You ought to hear him say Lochwinnoch or Auchtermuchty.

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Yogi19MoonieBaz
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